John Paddock

June 18, 2019

 

Doyle Davidson traces his lineage to John Paddock of Plymouth Colony through his great-grandmother, Sarah Louisa (Paddock) Miller, wife of Newell Miller.

 

According to The Paddock Genealogy, John’s father, Robert Paddock was born in Ireland about 1584 to John and Jane Paddock. Robert’s father was a blacksmith and Robert learned the trade. It is suggested by several researchers, he first married Mary Ball and second, Mary Holmes. They came to America possibly in 1634. Mary Holmes died about 1646 and Robert remarried, to the widow Mary (Trine) Palmer. Robert was chosen as a constable of Plymouth in June 1646.

 

He died on November 19, 1650. He left no will, but according to records, he placed John, his youngest son, with Captain Thomas Willett, with the consent of his wife Mary (Trine-Palmer) and the widow later testified that it was so:

 

"Whereas Robert Padduk of Plym: lately decease did on his death bed give and dispose his sonne John Paddock aged about give years unto Captaine Tho:Willet to bee att his desposing and under his guidance as his own child: These presents doe therefore wittness that Mary Padduck the wife of said Robert Padduck doth condesend unto and allow of the said acte of her Said husband in the disposing of her Said sonne John to Captain Willet as aforesaid In Witness of the promises shee the Said Mary hath hereunto sett her hand and given way to have this present said writing entered upon publick Record."  Mary Paddock then signed this by making her mark (an M).

 
Widow Mary sold the property in Plymouth a month later and in March of the following year, remarried.

 

Captain Thomas Willett was born in Norfolk, England in 1610 and spent his early years in Leiden, Holland learning to speak both English and Dutch. He embarked for New England around in 1629 on the Mayflower. Settling in Plymouth Colony he was active in the affairs of the colony. He began trading with the Dutch at New Amsterdam and within a few years had a small fleet of ships. He became assistant governor to Peter Stuyvesant, Governor of New Amsterdam and was involved in the negotiations of the surrender of Amsterdam, from the Dutch to the English. Later, Governor Nichols appointed him as the first mayor of New York in 1665 and he served in that office again in 1667. When the Dutch resumed control of the colony, Willett returned to Massachusetts where he died in 1674.

 
It is suggested by researchers that John Paddock was a servant to Captain Willett until he had fulfilled his indenture and married Anna Jones. The mention of his name and a small inheritance in the Captain’s will supports that idea:

 

"my old servant John Padducke" £10.."

 

John Paddock was born in Plymouth Colony in 1643. He married Anna Jones in Swansea, Massachusetts in 1673.

 

Anna Jones was born in 1643 in Swansea, Massachusetts (or Rehoboth). Her father, Robert Jones was born in England and came to America as early as 1636. H married Anna Bibble and they resided at Hull. (Hull was a trading post of Plymouth Colony, established in 1621 according to Wikipedia). Robert Sr., Anna’s grandfather, is also buried in Massachusetts.

 

There are five children recorded born to John and Anna Paddock. John included his daughters Mary Salisbury and Deborah Woodman and sons James and John, along with his wife Anna in his last will and testament. John Paddock died May 1719 and Anna died January 1725, both in Swansea, Massachusetts, however burial sites are unknown at this time.

 

John and Anna’s son, John, was born in 1682 in Massachusetts. He married Deborah Hillard, daughter of William and Deborah (Warren) Hillard, in 1706 in Little Compton, Massachusetts (Little Compton became part of Rhode Island in 1747 when the border changed by a Royal commission.). Deborah died in 1722 and John died in May 17, 1762 both in Dutchess County, New York, Six children are recorded born to them, including son William.

 

William was born about 1717 in New York and married Ruth Bell about 1743 in New York. Twelve children are recorded born to them. Ruth died in 1770 and William died in 1781, both in Washington County, New York. Place of burial is unknown at this time.

 

William and Ruth’s son John was born in 1765 in Nine Partners, Dutchess County, New York.
John married Christina Head and researchers of the Paddock family have made note of fifteen children born to John, ten sons and five daughters, although it appears several died young. John served in the Revolutionary War, enlisting at Kinderhook, July 1, 1781 and also served as private in the New York State militia during the War of 1812. He died July 3, 1838 and Christina in 1797, both in Camillus, Onondaga County, New York. John is buried in Oswego Bitter Cemetery in Camillus, New York; Christina’s burial site is unknown at this time.

 

John and Christina’s son William was born in 1792 in New York. He married Sarah (Sally) Hall in Onondaga County, New York in 1809. They moved to Jackson County, Michigan in 1836 where he “engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death.”

 

Eight children are recorded born to William and Sarah. William died January 14, 1841 in Waterloo Township, Michigan. and Sarah died in 1845. Their place of burial is unknown at this time.

 

Their oldest son, Griffin, was born October 8, 1815 in Camillus, Onondaga County, New York.
Griffin, married Mary (Lincoln) Brewster, May 31, 1815. Three children are recorded born to them, twin boys, James and Charles, born March 4, 1842 and daughter Sarah Louise, born June 27, 1848.

 

Griffin was an attorney and served as a probate-judge, 1849-1852. He was elected to the office of circuit court in 1852, and again in 1858 (Ingham County, Michigan) and appointed as a public notary 1843, 1861. He also served as a justice of the peace in 1847. He was a landowner in Waterloo Township, Jackson County, and after moving to Ingham County, owned land in White Oak and Bunkerhill Townships.

 

Griffin served in the Civil War for the Union, enlisting at forty-three years of age, in Detroit, Michigan August 22, 1862 with the 5th Calvary Regiment, Co. C. His son Charles also served, enlisting August 28, 1862, a member of the Michigan Fourth Calvary Regiment, Co, E. Charles assisted in the capture of Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy.

 

There were several other sons of the Paddock family who served in the Civil War. Griffin’s brother Homer was practicing law when he joined the 17th Indiana Infantry. Homer later settled in Rich Hill, Missouri. Margaret Ann (Paddock) Marshall had four sons in the war, Caroline (Paddock) Overdecker’s son, Mary (Paddock) Gorton’s son and Harrier (Paddok) Brink’s three sons also served.

 

An interesting note, two of Griffin’s sisters married Gorton brothers who are descendants of Samuel Gorton, a founder of Rhode Island. Martha Paddock married Theodore Gorton and Mary Ann married Aaron T. Gorton, sons of Rufus Gorton, Sr.

 

Griffin died in October 20, 1884 and Mary died October 8, 1883 both in Dansville, Ingham County, Michigan. Place of burial is unknown at this time.

 
Griffin and Mary’s daughter Sarah, was born in White Oak Township, Ingham County, Michigan June 27, 1848. She married Newell Miller May 19, 1867 in Ingham County. Newell was a veteran of the Civil War, serving from 1861 – 1865. He enlisted in Company B, Michigan 2nd Cavalry Regiment on October 2, 1861 as a private, was promoted to Full Corporal on January 6, 1864.and promoted to Full Sergeant on June 13, 1865.He was mustered out on August 17, 1865 at Macon, Georgia. The Paddock genealogy states they moved from Michigan to Newton County, Missouri in 1881.
Eight children are recorded born to Newell and Sarah, five daughters (one died in infancy) and three sons. Sarah died January 9, 1920 and Newell died March 26, 1919. They are buried in Diamond Cemetery, Diamond, Missouri.

 

Frank, their youngest son, was born in 1883 near Pepsin, Newton County, Missouri. He married Minnie Virkler and to them were born three daughters, Alba Sara, Myrtle Virginia and Dorothy (died at a very young age.) Frank was a farmer, growing strawberries, and also served as the city marshal for Diamond. Minnie died June 21, 1964 and Frank died one month later, July 20, 1964. They are both buried at Diamond Cemetery, Diamond, Newton County, Missouri.

 

Their daughter Alba, (Doyle’s mother) was born September 16, 1908. She married Lyle Luther Davidson December 24, 1927 in Labette County, Kansas. Lyle was the son of Luther and Georgia Anna (Long) Davidson, born December 16, 1907 west of Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri. To them were born four children, Dorothy Eileen, Doyle Eugene, Betty Joyce and Glenda Kaye. Lyle died February 28, 1996 and Alba died January 4, 1998. They are buried in Sarcoxie Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Further information can be found here.

 

 

Compiled by Kathryn Currier

 

Sources: Ancestry.com; Malloy Miller research; The Paddock Genealogy: Descendants of Robert Paddock, of Plymouth Colony, Blacksmith and Constable 1646 (Curfman 1977); Livingston County Daily Press (1916); Portrait and Biographical Album of Gratiot County, MI (Chapman Bros).; Davidson Family History by Neva (Davidson) Dodson; Water of Life Ministries.

 

kc 6/18/2019

 

 

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